The Lit Collective Student Blog

Welcome to our brand new student blog!

TLC have teamed up with the University of Sheffield to set up an Arts & Culture blog – open to all womxn of colour working or studying at the University. We believe that more spaces need to be created that platform our critical and creative excellence and with this blog we aim to do just that. We want your reflections on literature, film, music, art, TV and other cultural media, as well as your short stories, poems and experimental writing!

To help get the creative juices flowing, we will announce a new theme every six weeks for you to respond to. Successful submissions will be edited by a team of postgraduates and academics, all womxn of colour, and then uploaded to this website.

Word Count: 500-1500 words for essays and short stories. No word count for poetry.

Link to style guide here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Zdyx3AaDpaox5k6kspBgsCw-8nLbyfxOX1XLNy_LDGg/edit?usp=sharing


  • Beginnings
    The trouble with beginnings is there’s a lot to worry about. From fear of the unknown, to anxiety about new, unfamiliar things, to not knowing if what you’re doing is right- it can all build up and be incredibly mentally exhausting.  I’m sat here currently writing this blog, having spent the morning steadying myself. InhalingContinue reading “Beginnings”
  • Shadow
    Fading memories of a young boy with a bad temper and skinny legs. Never been short of food but my brothers and sister don’t have enough to eat, call my name and my hair thins. I open my eyes to a blazing sun and a ripe mango, the juices dripping down my chin. My islandContinue reading “Shadow”
  • Confronting violent images in the age of media overload
    TW: Police brutality, antiblack violence The sentiment goes that a picture is worth a thousand words.  On the 25th of May 2020, a ten-minute-long video was shot, showing the arrest of a forty-six-year-old unarmed Black man by the police. The man is seen on the ground, pleading for his life as a police officer loomsContinue reading “Confronting violent images in the age of media overload”

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